Hikes & Walks

You Need To Do This Hike in Freycinet National Park

Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit

Google ‘best hikes in Freycinet National Park’ and you’re going to find lists and lists of hikes you can do in the area.

But realistically, if you only have 1 day to explore the Freycinet Peninsula during your Tasmanian road trip, you need to do this hike.

The Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit is definitely the best walk in Freycinet National Park if you only have one day available.

The 11km route takes you to various lookouts, as well as two remote beaches that can’t be accessed by car or public transport.

After taking you to the famous Wineglass Bay Lookout, it also leads you down to Wineglass Bay Beach, where you can swim or sunbathe without paying for an expensive boat trip.

Wineglass Bay Beach in Freycinet National Park

Even better, the hike then takes you across the narrow peninsula to Hazards Beach on the other side, before winding along the headland high above Great Oyster Bay back to the car park.

Yes, the Mount Amos hike is super popular with great views of Wineglass Bay, but it’s a hard climb and you don’t get to feel that dazzling white sand between your toes down on Wineglass Bay Beach.

1. Wineglass Bay Car Park to Coles Bay Lookout

The hike begins at Wineglass Bay Car Park, which is almost where the road stops in Freycinet National Park.

To get here, enter the park on Freycinet Drive and keep going until you see a left turn-off for Mount Amos & Wineglass Bay.

The car park at the start of the Hazards Bay Circuit Walk via Wineglass Bay Freycinet National Park
The car park at the start of the Wineglass Bay & Hazards Beach Circuit

At the start you’ll see that there are two different paths for the Wineglass Bay Track, choose the track on the right which ascends via Coles Bay Lookout.

Coles Bay Lookout offers brilliant views across the calm ocean to Coles Bay on the other side.

Coles Bay Lookout Freycinet
Coles Bay Lookout via Beinghyk

2. Coles Bay Lookout to Wineglass Bay Lookout

After enjoying the views over Coles Bay, continue walking for around 20 minutes to reach Wineglass Bay Lookout.

Wineglass Bay Lookout is one of the most photographed spots in Tasmania, featuring a crescent curve of beach with The Hazards mountain range in the background.

Wineglass Bay Lookout in Freycinet National Park
Wineglass Bay Lookout in Freycinet National Park

3. Wineglass Bay Lookout to Wineglass Bay Beach

Next, it’s time to descend to the beach itself.

Continue following the Wineglass Bay Track down stone steps through bushland, before reaching the white sandy shores of Wineglass Bay Beach.

One of the most stunning beaches in Australia, Wineglass Bay Beach is a must-see for tourists.

Spend some time here enjoying the sand between your toes and swimming in the ocean.

Wineglass Bay Beach Freycinet
Wineglass Bay Beach in Freycinet National Park

In general, Wineglass Bay Beach is a safe spot for swimming with a General Hazard Rating of 3/10.

However, the beach is not patrolled so always swim with caution.

4. Wineglass Bay Beach to Hazards Beach

After relaxing at Wineglass Bay Beach, it’s time to hike over to the opposite side of the narrow piece of land to see Hazards Beach.

To do this, you need to take the Isthmus Track from Wineglass Bay Beach.

The Isthmus Track follows a lovely boardwalk through eucalypt woodland.

The Isthmus Track Freycinet
The Isthmus Track in Freycinet National Park

This is a great section of the walk to see native birds and wildlife so keep your eyes peeled.

At the end of the Isthmus Track the boardwalk will begin to trail downhill and you’ll see Hazards Beach ahead of you.

Arriving at Hazards Beach from the Isthmus Track in Freycinet National Park
Arriving at Hazards Beach from the Isthmus Track in Freycinet National Park

5. Hazards Beach: Heading North

The Isthmus Track brings you out on Hazards Beach, and the next part of the walk involves a leisurely stroll along the sandy beach to the northern end.

Hazards Beach is relatively sheltered within the bay, but it does have a General Hazard Rating of 5/10 for swimming.

Because the beach is not patrolled, it is recommended that you only swim at the northern end and stay in shallow water.

At the northern tip of the beach you’ll find a couple of rocky coves which are really sheltered and great for swimming or snorkeling.

This secret swimming spot definitely makes this route the absolute best hike in Freycinet National Park.

The rocky cove at the northern end of Hazards Beach in Freycinet National Park
The rocky cove at the northern end of Hazards Beach in Freycinet National Park

6. Hazards Beach to Wineglass Bay Car Park

The last part of the walk is along the Hazards Beach Track from the northern end of Hazards Beach.

The first section of the track takes you away from the beach through bushland, where you’ll likely see wallabies enjoying the shade.

After a while, the track veers uphill onto the headland and you’ll be rewarded with excellent views of Great Oyster Bay below.

Views of Great Oyster Bay on the Wineglass Bay & Hazards Beach Circuit
Views of Great Oyster Bay on the Wineglass Bay & Hazards Beach Circuit

After stopping to take in the view, keep following the clearly marked path through the lush vegetation until you reach Wineglass Bay Car Park once again.

Things You Need To Know Before Starting the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit

How long is the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit?
The Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit is an 11km hike and will take you about 3 hours to complete.

How difficult is the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit?
This is a moderate walk requiring a decent fitness level. You will need to be able to ascend and descend steep stone steps, and be able to walk on soft sand.

Are there toilets available on the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit?
There are good toilet facilities at Wineglass Bay Car Park at the start of the walk. Once you descend onto Wineglass Bay Beach there are also some drop toilets.

Is the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit accessible?
Unfortunately, the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit is not an accessible walk for wheelchair users or those with limited mobility.

Do you need to pay to visit Freycinet National Park?
A valid park pass is required for entry to all of Tasmania’s national parks, including Freycinet National Park. Day passes cost $20 per person or $40 per vehicle (up to 8 people). If you’re doing a road trip around Tasmania and you plan on visiting a few national parks, then you should get the 2 month holiday pass for $80 per vehicle (includes Cradle Mountain National Park). You don’t need to wait until the visitors centre opens to get your pass, you can buy it online here and enter the park as early as you like.

I hope you enjoyed my guide to the best hike in Freycinet National Park. Don’t miss The Best Seafood & Fish You Need to Eat in Tasmania and The 11 Unmissable Photo Opportunities in Tasmania.